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BORDER WALLS WORK

Unnamed

APRIL 2019 • NACO, ARIZONA

We went south to the Arizona / Mexico border to see for ourselves just what was going on down there. Some friends figured we’d need AR-15s, with all the trouble reported. If we needed that kind of firepower, we’d be in the wrong place, or better make a U turn. We didn’t need anything more than credit cards for gift shops, gas, grub and board.

We figured from the sound of it, driving the dirt border road inches from Mexico and back trails through empty desert leading to it, especially if heavily armed, would surely get us stopped at least once, possibly disarmed for the duration of the stop, so maybe dress nice and don’t bring a gun you might not get back so easily.

If the situation was that tense, “this ain’t our kind of place,” to quote Charlie Daniels and in the end it didn’t matter, it didn’t matter at all. Not only didn’t we get stopped, we had to stop Border Patrol guys to ask questions, or they would have just waved as they drove by or waved us through a checkpoint. Honestly, we don't fit the profile. Profiling is a good thing, I've always said that. Because it's true. Everyone in law enforcement knows that. It's how you distinguish good guys from bad guys, at the get go.

It's an organized incursion,
not random migration.

Bottom line -- we basically found no illegal immigration problem from Douglas to Sierra Vista, where years ago there was a massive flood. The flow of people is being directed -- directed I say -- which is obvious and was also confirmed by BP people -- to locations that have (get this) sufficient food, water, housing, clothing, medical attention and basically bookkeeping facilities to handle them. I heard there are commercials running south of the border telling people now is the time to come.

And too many are now coming to handle at all, we were told in southern Arizona. But coming elsewhere, not where we were. The Yuma Sheriff publicly announced it's a crisis, they are absolutely overrun. The Tombstone Marshall told us personally all is quiet in his neck of the woods, matching what the locals told us, every one. It's an organized invasion, not random migration.

It was frustrating to sit in a Border Patrol border office and not get a straight answer about who is directing the traffic to us. ‘We don’t know, that’s not our responsibility, we just enforce the law, we don’t have that information...’ You don’t have any idea, don’t you talk among yourselves, don’t you guess, don’t you hear things from the border crossers? Don’t you have intel people in those countries, or get it somehow? I ran out of ways to ask -- not an easy thing for me. They haven’t got a clue, if you believe them on that. It’s not plausible.

Driving that dirt road, "Border Road," you can see why no one comes across here any longer. There’s a frickin’ damn big dangerous patrolled fence. It didn’t take two-point-five gazillion dollars to build either, or a decade. Firmly rooted rugged metal pipes stretch skyward, encased in razor ribbon and concertina wire. Ain’t no mother with her baby scaling this puppy and jumping. And that would do you no good. You'd land in the dirt patrol road, facing the next fence, same build. Survive that and you’re on the next dirt patrol road, all of which have flood lights and sensor arrays. And BP vehicles typically in sight of each other. Oh, didn’t the “news” mention any of this, or show it in endlessly looped video?

Fence quality and style changed from mile to mile. It was not something I would want to try to defeat even though some fencing was a softer target than other sections. This was south and east of Naco, Arizona, where years ago, foreigners tramped across a border protected by a few strands of broken barbed wire.

It wasn't us as weekend warriors facing death from banditos, this was a lovely walk in the park, a couple of days out of town. We grilled every shopkeeper, eatery owner, waitress, gift and clothing shop clerk (southern Arizona is blistered with wonderful little shops) about the non-citizens flooding through. Boring. I think we either heard stories they thought we wanted to hear, repeated, that the media just likes to scare people, or odd stories of a few bedraggled people outside of town. We saw no signs, not even scat.

So if they’re flooding the ports of entry, and other states, how much time will we need to go around and check them out? Mass media promoted February as a record setting month for captured break ins. Then announced that March set a new record, 114,000, and predicted April would beat that. Tell me someone is not orchestrating this. Tell me also Border Patrol has no idea what’s happening. Which is worse -- they really don’t know, or they know damn well and it keeps going on with their knowledge?

Don’t forget the military question: We’ve been told the military is on the border. This was especially important for my friend, and he asked about it every chance he could. Where are they? We didn’t see any. We were informed by BP (something we already knew) that the military can’t enforce civilian law, posse comitatus and all that. Fine, we don't want military enforcing civilian law on our soil.

“They’re in a support role, so we are freed up to do this work.’ So what’s a support role? None of the answers made sense. They’re doing administrative work. You have the National Guard working as secretaries? Seriously? They’re repairing vehicles. Don’t you have a motor pool, like, with mechanics? Do solders do truck maintenance? The deeper we dug, the deeper the hole. It seemed they had been coached, trained with talking points, how to deflect, we don’t know where the military support is. Not visible is one answer.

I know I'm going to hear how wrong this all is. I need to know where to look for what. Douglas was a ghost town. The roads winding their way through barren desert down that way were barren. A brief second run through Yuma looked quiet and calm. Well, that's 30 minutes from the border, say, San Luis. Foot and vehicle traffic through that port of entry seemed normal, stores were in operation. Admittedly, it was a cursory view, better look next time. But I sure wouldn't want to attempt those fences. Not with all the watchers, razor wire, or carrying anything, wall after wall. I definitely must be missing something.

I did notice the Ingraham Angle was screaming the scream, but with all the resources FOX could bring to bear, her videos showed a total of six illegals -- a few in a river (unidentified), and a few being loaded into the back of a Border Patrol vehicle.

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  • Freelance writer Alan Korwin is a founder and past president of the Arizona Book Publishing Association. With his wife Cheryl he operates Bloomfield Press, the largest producer and distributor of gun-law books in the country. Here writing as "The Uninvited Ombudsman," Alan covers the day's stories as they ought to read. Read more.

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